Not Yet a Customer? Contact Us Today at

1-877-840-8218

Different Types of CGM Devices

Different Types of CGM Devices

CGMs (Continuous Glucose Monitoring) always have the same three components: sensor, transmitter, and receiver. However, the way those components work varies significantly. If you are new to CGM systems knowing what type of CGM to purchase can be overwhelming.

The first thing that you should do when deciding on a specific type of CGM is to consult your healthcare provider and insurance company. Your physician may have a specific type of CGM in mind for your situation. Or, your insurance company may only cover a specific CGM model.

After consulting your physician and insurance company, then it’s time to read this article. It will explain the four different CGM types, their pros and cons, and how to choose between them.

CGM suppliers

Since each supplier’s CGM is so different, it is worth a quick review of the four main CGM brands.

Dexcom
Dexcom was the second company to have its CGM approved in 2006. They were founded in 1999, so they are much younger than Medtronic. However, Dexcom also excels in the production of medical devices. Dexcom is headquartered in San Diego, CA.

Currently, they manufacture products specifically designed for diabetes. These include CGM systems, online apps, and pumps. US Med offers the Dexcom G5 Mobile and the G6 CGM.

Abbott
Abbott Laboratories is another American health care company that produces CGMs. They have the longest history of the four companies described here, as they were founded in 1888. But, it wasn’t until 2008 that their CGM was approved by the FDA.

Today you will find pharmaceuticals, devices, diagnostics, and nutrition supplements made by Abbott Laboratories. They do not specialize in CGMs or diabetes-related products. However, Abbott’s Freestyle Libre System is a major trendsetter.

Eversense
The newest CGM brand is Eversense. Their implantable CGM was approved by the FDA in 2018. Like Dexcom, Eversense specializes in diabetes management systems. They currently offer a single CGM in the United States. Their Eversense XL was approved for use in Europe in 2017.

Different types of CGM devices

There are currently four main CGM systems on the market. Each one of these systems is manufactured by one of the four suppliers listed above.

Guardian Sensor 3

The current iteration of Medtronic’s CGM is the Guardian Sensor 3. It provides continuous readings of your blood glucose levels. The sensor only lasts seven days, but it is 80% smaller than the Enlite sensor.

Plus, this CGM system connects with the Sugar.IQ personal diabetes assistant by Medtronic. The assistant provides information about your daily patterns and how they affect your glucose levels.

 

Pros
Alarms tell you when your blood sugar is too high or low.
Has both Android and iPhone apps.
Can share your glucose data.

Cons
Requires fingerstick measurements.
Only approved for ages 18+
Using acetaminophen affects your readings.

 

G5/G6

Dexcom’s G5 Mobile and G6 are approved for anyone over two. The G6 does not need fingerstick calibration while the G5 does need calibration. The sensor on the G5 lasts for seven days and the sensor for the G6 lasts for ten days. The G6 can even take accurate readings when you have ingested acetaminophen.

Despite their differences, all of the Dexcom CGMs use the continuous tracking method, which continuously monitors your glucose levels. Alarms will sound on these devices when your blood glucose has reached thresholds that are either too high or too low.

 

Pros
Continuous monitoring and alarm system keeps you informed.
Data is sent directly to your Smartphone app.
You can customize the alerts.
Approved for anyone over two

Cons
Sensors for both machines have to be replaced often
You can’t reuse the sensors.
Both systems are expensive.

 

Freestyle Libre

Abbott’s Freestyle Libre is a revolutionary CGM device. It was approved in 2017 and is the first CGM that does not require fingerstick calibration or measurements. In terms of ease of use, the Freestyle Libre cannot be beaten. This is the only type of CGM that does not provide continuous reading or automatic alarms. You must tell the device when you want to know your glucose levels

The sensor is external, so it does not require a physician to put it in. The sensor will also last you fourteen days. The Freestyle Libre reader can store up to ninety days of your blood glucose data, and the sensor itself store up to eight hours of unread data.

 

Pros
Does not need fingersticks.
Covered by Medicare.
Sensor lasts fourteen days.
Sensor can store eight hours of unread data.

Cons
The Freestyle Libre system available in the U.S. does not have alarms.
Can not share your data with other programs.
Reader must be charged once per week.

 

Eversense—Implantable CGM

The newest type of CGM on the market, the Eversense Implantable CGM uses an implanted sensor, which means that you don’t have to worry about changing anything for 90 days. The Eversense XL, already approved in Europe, lasts a whopping 180 days. Because this CGM system uses an internal sensor, the transmitter still has to be placed on your skin, so you will still have part of the device visible.

The Eversense CGM system uses continuous monitoring of your blood glucose levels. Because your levels are constantly monitored, alarms will sound when they go either too high or too low.

 

Pros
Does not need fingersticks.
Covered by Medicare.
Sensor lasts fourteen days.
Sensor can store eight hours of unread data.

Cons
The Freestyle Libre system available in the U.S. does not have alarms.
Can not share your data with other programs.
Reader must be charged once per week.

 

Conclusion

As you can tell, the four types of CGM have similarities and differences. You will find some variation in the location of the sensor (inside or outside your skin), the alarm system, the approved age range, and the sensor life. But, other than that, all four types of CGM work the same. The product you choose will depend on your lifestyle and physician recommendation.

 

Share US MED Now

US MED

8260 NW 27th Street
Suite #403
Doral, FL 33122
Current Patients Call:
1-877-USMED-98
(1-877-876-3398)
New Patients Call:
1-877-840-8218

Please follow & like us :)

USMED Twitter

How to Keep Injection Sites Healthy - ow.ly/Oj1A50qNSxT Lipohypertrophy is a thickened, rubbery swelling under the skin that happens to people where they inject insulin. Check out this helpful article on how to safety inject insulin #diabetes #T1 #T2 pic.twitter.com/Ctnv…