Call us Today at

1-877-840-8218

Solar Eclipse

TOTALITY: The Great American Solar Eclipse

TOTALITY: The Great American Solar Eclipse

From Oregon to South Carolina, Americans will see the sight of a Solar Eclipse that has left mankind trembling and astonished as long as humans have walked the earth.

The Great American Total Eclipse will be one for the record books as totality junkies from across the globe hurry to the best viewing destinations.

On August 21, 2017, for the first time in 99 years, the earth, moon, and stars will line up perfectly in a total eclipse that can be viewed in 14 states. Best viewing is predicted to be in Oregon where sunshine is predicted, especially near Madras. Local time will be 10:21 am PDT and totality will last for about 2 minutes and 7 to 8 seconds, depending on where the viewer stands.

On the east coast, the eclipse will start a little after 1 p.m. and reach totality just before 3 p.m.

Further inland, viewers in Illinois and Kentucky will experience 40 seconds more totality.

“A solar eclipse can only take place at the phase of new moon, when the moon passes directly between the sun and Earth and its shadow falls upon Earth’s surface,” according to space.com.

The eclipse will be actively pursued by a sub-culture of totality followers who travel to various parts of the world to experience the out-of-this world phenomena many times during the year. Scientists will also be watching the display and the shadow allows them to see solar flares.

No, you can’t look at the sun and watch the solar eclipse. Just no.

If you have ever held a small magnifying glass over dry grass, you know what happens. The sun’s rays become so focused that the grass catches fire.

That is what will happen to your eyes if you attempt to watch the eclipse. Your retina will burn up. You won’t know it until you can’t see any more.

DO NOT LOOK AT THE SUN WITH THE NAKED EYE.

Do not look at the eclipse through binoculars or a telescope or a camera lens. The same thing happens: Your retina burns up.

Do NOT use sunglasses, Polaroid filters, smoked glass, exposed color film, x-ray film, or photographic neutral-density filters.

What you can do is make a pinhole projector. There are many instructions online for this.

Are you within the path of the Total Solar Eclipse? Check here: https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/nation/

 

US MED

8260 NW 27th Street
Suite #403
Doral, FL 33122
Current Patients Call:
1-877-USMED-98
(1-877-876-3398)
New Patients Call:
1-877-840-8218

USMED Twitter

Happy 4th! Even if the party isn't as big this year, July 4th and family go great together. Spend less time worrying about hypoglycemia & more time enjoying with a Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM). Most T1D's are insurance eligible. bit.ly/38kH0ow #Dexcom #FreestyleLibre pic.twitter.com/r8oi…