November 6, 2017

Have Medicare and Need to Manage your Diabetes?

In 2017 Medicare covered 58 million Americans, and to a lot of us, it can seem like a complicated labyrinth.  For those over 65 years of age, it is essential health coverage administered by the United States government.  It’s a…

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Now have Medicare and need to manage your Diabetes

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In 2017 Medicare covered 58 million Americans, and to a lot of us, it can seem like a complicated labyrinth.  For those over 65 years of age, it is essential health coverage administered by the United States government.  It’s a daunting task to understand it right away, but here is some information to mitigate the steep learning curve.

Medicare, being such a massive program, is broken up into four sections.

  • Part A covers hospital stays, nursing facility care, hospices, and health care.
  • Part B covers doctor visits, outpatient care, medical devices, and requires a monthly premium.
  • Part C let’s people enroll in private insurance plans while still receiving benefits from parts A & B.
  • Part D covers prescription drugs.

Part A solely covers care at home and medical facilities, but medicare can cover diabetic supplies such as medication, monitoring equipment, insulin delivery products, and therapeutic aids.  These supplies are usually covered in Parts B & D which also include things like meter strips, lancets, insulin, insulin pumps, and Continuous Glucose Metering devices.

Regular screenings such as the fasting blood glucose test are covered under part B.  Over time, poor blood circulation can cause complications such as foot disease, and as such, foot exams, therapeutic footwear, and shoe inserts all fall under part B of the Medicare program.  Nutrition therapy and training for newly diagnosed diabetics are also covered as to provide guidance for those beginning to deal with or struggling in controlling their Diabetes.

Part D involves outpatient prescription drug benefit, which requires a monthly premium based on your level of income.  Various plans fall under Part D, but it all depends on your individual drug needs (click here to find your plan).

 

Read more here.

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